I should have been writing. Instead…Stovetop Chocolate Cake.

 

File_001Yes, stovetop. A challenge worth pursuing.

This recipe came from Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street website.

And I have to say, as with Cook’s Country/America’s Test Kitchen [C. Kimball’s most recent endeavor], the accompanying video segments were extremely helpful.

***

As the cake steams–yep, steams– toward completion, some questions and notions:

  • This will be my default ‘baking’ method during the heat of summer. 
  • A while back, I mentioned my tendency to do weird, lame stuff in the kitchen, such as mixing or chopping at the very edge of the counter. Wull-gee, what are the odds something’s going to end up on the floor? I do eventually learn from repeated bungling, however. So this time, the floor was spared the usual cascade of ingredients. Bravo.
  • Buuuut, did that keep me from having my laptop hanging precariously over counter’s edge as I began typing this post? Uhhh, no. Seems like once I hit my threshold of competency, all bets are off. Hide the knives, check the burners, and pray. [Doesn’t matter which god you choose, by the way. They all understand kitchen hazards. And at some point in the process, I become the poster child.]
  • I should have hired a first-grader to cut my circle of parchment paper to fit the bottom of the pan.
  • With this stovetop strategy, will we still be treated to the warm, enveloping aroma of a baked chocolate cake? Answer: No.
  • I’m not supposed to lift that lid till the prescribed 23 minutes has lapsed. I actually resisted. Decision: It needed an extra five to seven minutes. On the upside, unless the water has evaporated, the risk of burning the cake is minimal. In other words, steam bath: forgiving…oven heat: cruel and merciless.
  • When it comes to chocolate desserts, our mantra: Dark = better. Darker = more better.
  • Always remember: Eating cake by the hunk enhances flavor by 23%. [Margin of error: +/- 5%]
  • My wife rolls her eyes at my Philistine ways, bBut I say, ‘If I bake it, I break it.’ And it’s oh-so-good that way. Besides, she gets to even out the ragged edges.

Final verdict: This recipe is a keeper. The cake came out dark and dense and moist. What more could you want?

 

File_000(1)

The steaming takes place inside a Dutch oven–actually any pot with a tight-fitting lid and deep/wide enough to fit an eight or nine-inch cake pan. The coil of aluminum foil simply keeps the cake above the heated water.

File_000

The chocolate shmeer on the plate is a sure sign of this cake’s moistness. [The added chocolate chunks don’t hurt either.]

Added notes: Apologies to Bitter Ben, whose blog I follow. Rather than bittersweet, I used semi-sweet chocolate chunks from Trader Joe’s.

And to faithful reader Virginia [Roses in the Rubble], try this recipe. It should be a fair payback for the recipes you’ve shared with me.

 

7 thoughts on “I should have been writing. Instead…Stovetop Chocolate Cake.

  1. Oooooh Tim, that looks decadently moist & delish! I’m with you: more dark = more better. Will definitely have to give it a try (plus so nice not to heat kitchen up in summer, but still have cake & eat it, too?) 😋🎂🤗🎂😋

    1. I just knew I would come under your bitter, yet utterly deserved, scrutiny. Let me throw a little Latin your way: “Mea culpa.” I’m continuing to enjoy your work, by the way. [Fellow blogsters, when in doubt, always try to suck up to any disapproving readers. ;-]

      1. I don’t understand your fancy Latin. And I am too lazy to Google your words and find out what they mean. I will just assume that you are just making excuses for not using bitter things always.

      2. Ben, don’t you just hate those snooty people who, instead of using plain English, use foreign language to show off about the only two words they remember from long-past days? Snooty, I tell you, snooty. Good job on holding the line against people like that who seem to think folks are going to click to the nearest translation page on the Internet. The madness has to stop! And yes, the use of Latin was absolutely a way to deflect attention from my bungling in the kitchen. Whoooaaa…Bungling in the Kitchen…I feel a new blog coming on…

      3. Ben, don’t you just hate those snooty people who, instead of using plain English, use foreign language to show off about the only two words they remember from long-past days? Snooty, I tell you, snooty. Good job on holding the line against people like that who seem to think folks are going to click to the nearest translation page on the Internet. The madness has to stop! And yes, the use of Latin was absolutely a way to deflect attention from my bungling in the kitchen. Whoooaaa…Bungling in the Kitchen…I feel a new blog coming on…

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